Advertisement

Soil Moisture Conditions in Four Types of Forests in Kampong Thom, Cambodia

  • Makoto Araki
  • Jumpei Toriyama
  • Seiichi Ohta
  • Mamoru Kanzaki
  • Eriko Ito
  • Bora Tith
  • Sopheavuth Pol
  • Sopheap Lim
  • Saret Khorn
  • Phearak Pith
  • Seila Det

Abstract

Soil moisture conditions were observed in four types of forest in central Cambodia, where dry evergreen forests are distributed widely, to investigate differences of soil moisture in each forest and to clarify relationships between forest types and soil moisture conditions. Observations revealed that soil water contents were high during the rainy season in dry deciduous forest (DDF) and mixed forest (MF), which contained both evergreen and deciduous trees. Those areas have thinner tree crown density and less stand biomass than a dry evergreen forest (DEF). In contrast, during the dry season, water content was low in DDF and MF. That difference is attributable to the disparate evapotranspiration rates of forests caused by the tree crown density and stand biomass. Moreover, soil temperatures were affected by the type of forest. In areas with DDF forests, the temperatures were high in the months of April and May but were lower in MF, DEF, and DEFlog forests. Those differences were caused by inhibition of temperatures through shading effects of tree crowns and evapotranspiration by trees. Based on those observed data, this study clarified a relationship between forest stand type and soil moisture conditions in Kampong Thom forest area.

Keywords

Rainy Season Soil Temperature Groundwater Level Soil Water Content Mixed Forest 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Hiramatsu R, Kanzaki M, Toriyama J, Kaneko T, Okuda Y, Ohta S, Khorn S, Pith P, Lim S, Pol S, Ito E, Araki M (2007) Open woodland patches in an evergreen forest of Kampong Thom, Cambodia: Correlation of structure and composition with microtopography. In: Sawada H, Araki M, Chappell NA, LaFrankie JV, Shimizu A (eds) Forest Environments in the Mekong River Basin. Springer, Tokyo, pp 222–231Google Scholar
  2. Kim S, Kim PN, Koike M, Hayashi H (2006) Estimating actual and potential government revenues from timber harvesting in Cambodia. For Policy Econ 8:625–635Google Scholar
  3. Nobuhiro T, Shimizu A, Kabeya N, Tsuboyama Y, Kubota T, Abe T, Araki M, Tamai K, Chann S, Keth N (2007) Year-round observation of evapotranspiration in an evergreen broadleaf forest in Cambodia. In: Sawada H, Araki M, Chappell NA, LaFrankie JV, Shimizu A (eds) Forest Environments in the Mekong River Basin. Springer, Tokyo, pp 75–86Google Scholar
  4. Ohnuki Y, Kimhean C, Shinomiya Y, Sor S, Toriyama J, Ohta S (2007) Seasonal change of soil depth and soil hardness at forested areas in Kampong Thom Province, Cambodia. In: Sawada H, Araki M, Chappell NA, LaFrankie JV, Shimizu A (eds) Forest Environments in the Mekong River Basin. Springer, Tokyo, pp 263–272Google Scholar
  5. Tani A, Ito E, Kanzaki M, Ohta S, Khorn S, Pith P, Tith B, Pol S, Lim S (2007) Principal forest types of three regions of Cambodia: Kampong Thom, Kratie, and Mondolkiri. In: Sawada H, Araki M, Chappell NA, LaFrankie JV, Shimizu A (eds) Forest Environments in the Mekong River Basin. Springer, Tokyo, pp 201–213Google Scholar
  6. Top N, Mizoue N, Kai S (2004) Estimating forest biomass increment based on permanent sample plots in relation to woodfuel consumption. J For Res 9:117–123CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Toriyama J, Ohta S, Araki M, Kanzaki M, Khorn S, Pith P, Lim S, Pol S (2007) Soils under different forest types in dry evergreen forest zone in Cambodia: morphology, physicochemical properties and classification. In: Sawada H, Araki M, Chappell NA, LaFrankie JV, Shimizu A (eds) Forest Environments in the Mekong River Basin. Springer, Tokyo, pp 241–253Google Scholar
  8. World Bank, UNDP, and FAO (1996) Cambodia forest policy assessment. World Bank, Washington, DCGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Makoto Araki
    • 1
  • Jumpei Toriyama
    • 2
  • Seiichi Ohta
    • 2
  • Mamoru Kanzaki
    • 2
  • Eriko Ito
    • 1
  • Bora Tith
    • 3
  • Sopheavuth Pol
    • 3
  • Sopheap Lim
    • 3
  • Saret Khorn
    • 3
  • Phearak Pith
    • 3
  • Seila Det
    • 3
  1. 1.Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute (FFPRI)TsukubaJapan
  2. 2.Graduate School of AgricultureKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  3. 3.Forest and Wildlife Science Research Institute (FWSRI)Forestry AdministrationPhnom PenhCambodia

Personalised recommendations