Advertisement

Open Woodland Patches in an Evergreen Forest of Kampong Thom, Cambodia: Correlation of Structure and Composition with Microtopography

  • Reiko Hiramatsu
  • Mamoru Kanzaki
  • Jumpei Toriyama
  • Takayuki Kaneko
  • Youichirou Okuda
  • Seiichi Ohta
  • Saret Khorn
  • Phearak Pith
  • Sopheap Lim
  • Sopheavuth Pol
  • Eriko Ito
  • Makoto Araki

Abstract

Open woodland patches scattered in dense evergreen forest are a landscape peculiar to Kampong Thom Province. One of these open woodland patches was studied by setting a belt transect, and floral composition, stand structure, and habitat conditions were examined. Based on a census for trees 10 cm or greater in diameter at breast height (DBH), the forest along the transect was divided into three types that varied with topography. Most of the area was covered by gentle slopes and was dominated by Dipterocarpus obtusifolius, which displayed 50% canopy openness and poor species richness. The stands were located on rectilinear to convex sloping sites with low clay content that were waterlogged in the rainy season. Melaleuca cajuputi stands occurred in a small swamp, whereas on the slope M. cajuputi was mixed with D. obtusifolius. The M. cajuputi stands were geographically isolated from the coastal location more characteristic of the species. Along the stream or beside the swamp, where no waterlogging occurred even in the rainy season, we found Vatica odorata stands. Physical habitat conditions associated with the topography, such as clay content and soil water conditions, enable the three forest types with different physiognomies to coexist at this small spatial scale and may also explain the outpost patches of M. cajuputi.

Keywords

Forest Type Canopy Openness Evergreen Forest Stand Type Belt Transect 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Araki M, Toriyama J, Ohta S, Kanzaki M, Ito E, Sopheap L, Sopheavuth P, Bora T, Saret K, Phearak P, Saila D (2007) Soil moisture conditions in four types of forests in Kampong Thom, Cambodia. In: Sawada H, Araki M, Chappell NA, LaFrankie JV, Shimizu A (eds) Forest environments in the Mekong River basin. Springer, Tokyo, pp 254–262Google Scholar
  2. Crocker, CD (1962) The general soil map of the Kingdom of Cambodia and the exploratory survey of the soils of Cambodia. Royal Cambodian Government Soil Commission/United States Agency for International Development, Phnom PenhGoogle Scholar
  3. Dufrene M, Legendre P (1997) Species assemblages and indicator species: the need for a flexible asymmetrical approach. Ecol Monogr 67:345–366Google Scholar
  4. Hozumi K, Kira T, Shinozaki K (1969) Production ecology of tropical rain forests in southwestern Cambodia. I. Plant biomass. Nat Life SE Asia 6:1–52Google Scholar
  5. Nguyen NC, Cao TC, Vu VC, Nguyen XD, Vu VD, Nguyen KD, Tran H, Tran TO, Nguyen BQ, Nguyen NT (1996) Vietnam forest trees. Agricultural Publishing House, HanoiGoogle Scholar
  6. Kanzaki M, Hara M, Yamakura T, Tamura MN, Ohkubo T, Sri-ngernyuang K, Sahunalu P, Teejuntuk S, Bunyavejchewin S (2004). Doi Inthanon forest dynamic plot, Thailand. In: Losos EC, Condit R, LaFrankie JV, Leigh EG (eds) Tropical forest diversity and dynamism: findings from a network of large-scale forest dynamics plots. Chicago University Press, Chicago, pp 474–481Google Scholar
  7. Kochummen KM (1978) Myrtaceae. In: Ng FSP (ed) Tree flora of Malaya, vol 3. Longman Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, pp 169–253Google Scholar
  8. McCune, B, Mefford MJ (1999) Multivariate analysis of ecological data (version 4.17). MJM Software, Gleneden Beach, ORGoogle Scholar
  9. Ministry of Forestry (1995). Vietnam forestry. Agricultural Publishing House, HanoiGoogle Scholar
  10. Rollet B (1972) La Végétation Du Cambodge. Rev Bois For Trop 144, 145, 146Google Scholar
  11. Royal Forest Department (1962) Types of forest of Thailand. No. R 44. Royal Forest Department, BangkokGoogle Scholar
  12. Sri-Ngernyuang K, Kanzaki M, Mizuno T, Noguchi H, Teejuntuk S, Sungpalee C, Hara M, Yamakura T, Sahunalu P, Dhanmanonda P, Bunyavejchewin S (2003) Habitat differentiation of Lauraceae species in a tropical lower montane forest in northern Thailand. Ecol Res 18:1–14CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Suzuki K (1999) An ecological study of Melaleuca communities in littoral swamps. Eco-Habitat 6:133–141Google Scholar
  14. Suzuki K, Niyomdham C (1992) Phytosociological studies on topical peat swamps. 1. Classification of vegetation at Narathiwat, Thailand. Tropics 2:49–65Google Scholar
  15. Suzuki K, Laongpol C, Sridith K (2005) Phytosociological studies on vegetation of coastal dunes at Narathiwat, Thailand. Tropics 14:229–244CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Tani A, Ito E, Kanzaki M, Ohta S, Saret K, Phearak P, Bora T, Sopheavuth P, Sopheap L (2007) Principal forest types of three regions of Cambodia: Kompong Thom, Krache, and Mondolkiri. In: Sawada H, Araki M, Chappell NA, LaFrankie JV, Shimizu A (eds) Forest environments in the Mekong River basin. Springer, Tokyo, pp 201–213Google Scholar
  17. Tomita M, Hirabuki Y, Suzuki K, Hara K, Kaita N, Araki Y (2000) Drastic recovery of Melaleuca-dominant scrub after a severe fire: a three-year period study in a degraded peat swamp, Thailand. Eco-Habitat 7:81–87Google Scholar
  18. Toriyama J, Ohta S, Araki M, Kanzaki M, Saret K, Phearak P, Sopheap L, Sopheavuth P. (2007) Soils under different forest types in the dry evergreen forest zone in Cambodia: morphology, physicochemical properties and classification. In: Sawada H, Araki M, Chappell NA, LaFrankie JV, Shimizu A (eds) Forest environments in the Mekong River basin. Springer, Tokyo, pp 241–253Google Scholar
  19. Tsukawaki S, Sieng S (2005) Formation of the present natural environment on Lake Tonle Sap and the lower course of the Mekong River system in Cambodia: geological history of Cambodia during the last 20,000 years. In: Proceedings of international conference on forest environment in continental river basins; with a focus on the Mekong River. Sunway Hotel, Phnom Penh, Cambodia, 5th–7th December 2005Google Scholar
  20. Vidal JE (1997) Vegetation types and plants of the Indochinese Peninsula: international environmental databases. Ecocart, http://www.ecocart.com/Google Scholar
  21. World Bank, UNDP, and FAO (1996) Cambodia forest policy assessment. World Bank, Washington, DCGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Reiko Hiramatsu
    • 1
  • Mamoru Kanzaki
    • 2
  • Jumpei Toriyama
    • 2
  • Takayuki Kaneko
    • 2
  • Youichirou Okuda
    • 2
  • Seiichi Ohta
    • 2
  • Saret Khorn
    • 3
  • Phearak Pith
    • 3
  • Sopheap Lim
    • 3
  • Sopheavuth Pol
    • 3
  • Eriko Ito
    • 4
  • Makoto Araki
    • 4
  1. 1.Faculty of AgricultureKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  2. 2.Graduate School of AgricultureKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  3. 3.Forest and Wildlife Science Research Institute (FWSRI)Forestry AdministrationPhnom PenhCambodia
  4. 4.Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute (FFPRI)TsukubaJapan

Personalised recommendations