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Comparison of the Leaf Area Index (LAI) of Two Types of Dipterocarp Forest on the West Bank of the Mekong River, Cambodia

  • Eriko Ito
  • Saret Khorn
  • Sopheap Lim
  • Sopheavuth Pol
  • Bora Tith
  • Phearak Pith
  • Akihiro Tani
  • Mamoru Kanzaki
  • Takayuki Kaneko
  • Youichirou Okuda
  • Naoki Kabeya
  • Tatsuhiko Nobuhiro
  • Makoto Araki

Abstract

Leaf area index (LAI) is a key biophysical variable in most process-based models of forest ecosystems and water cycles. We compared the LAI of two types of tropical seasonal forest in Kampong Thom Province, Cambodia. The two forest types are extremes of crown-cover density, i.e., closed dry evergreen forest (DEF) and open dry deciduous forest (DDF), suggesting marked spatial variation in forest site conditions such as soil moisture. Monthly changes in LAI were estimated indirectly using a plant canopy analyzer and hemispherical photographs. Both methods of LAI estimation showed instrument errors, i.e., low reproducibility in the plant canopy analyzer data and LAI-saturation in hemispherical photograph data; nevertheless, LAI values differed between DEF and DDF. The average LAI from three years of measurements was about 4.6 times higher in DEF than in DDF. DDF exhibited much greater seasonality than DEF. The annual minimum LAI averaged 76% and 84% of the annual maximum LAI for DDF and DEF, respectively. LAI showed high peaks in the rainy season and decreased in the dry season. However, in DEF, LAI decreased twice annually, at the beginning of the dry season and the beginning of the rainy season. Seasonal changes in LAI could be approximated using a third-degree Fourier-series equation.

Keywords

Forest Type Leaf Area Index Leaf Phenology Dipterocarp Forest Mekong River Basin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eriko Ito
    • 1
  • Saret Khorn
    • 2
  • Sopheap Lim
    • 2
  • Sopheavuth Pol
    • 2
  • Bora Tith
    • 2
  • Phearak Pith
    • 2
  • Akihiro Tani
    • 3
  • Mamoru Kanzaki
    • 3
  • Takayuki Kaneko
    • 3
  • Youichirou Okuda
    • 3
  • Naoki Kabeya
    • 1
  • Tatsuhiko Nobuhiro
    • 1
  • Makoto Araki
    • 1
  1. 1.Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute (FFPRI)TsukubaJapan
  2. 2.Forest and Wildlife Science Research Institute (FWSRI)Forestry AdministrationPhnom PenhCambodia
  3. 3.Graduate School of AgricultureKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan

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