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Development of a Forward-Hemispherical Vision Sensor for Remote Control of a Small Mobile Robot and for Acquisition of Visual-Information

  • Jyun-ichi Eino
  • Masakazu Araki
  • Jun-ichi Takiguchi
  • Takumi Hashizume
Conference paper

Abstract

The target of this research is to develop a common-use sensor, which is useful for navigation and mission for rescue work. By combined use of ODV (OmniDirectional Vision) with a hemispherical forward-visual-field using a direct and reflection hybrid optical system, and MEMS (Micro Electro Mechanical Systems) IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit), the common-use sensor outputs a real-time image for remote control of the mobile robot and an environment map, including information on three-dimensional own-position, with a continuous panorama image for searching victims and for making a rescue plan.

Keywords

Remote Control Mobile Robot Inertial Measurement Unit Outdoor Environment Panoramic Image 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jyun-ichi Eino
    • 1
  • Masakazu Araki
    • 1
  • Jun-ichi Takiguchi
    • 2
  • Takumi Hashizume
    • 1
  1. 1.Waseda UniversityShinjukkuJapan
  2. 2.Kamakura WorksMitsubishi Electric CorporationKamakura-shiJapan

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