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Auditory Agnosia in Children

Abstract

The mechanism of hearing loss in patients with bilateral auditory cortex lesions remains controversial. This manifestation is known as auditory agnosia or cortical deafness and in adult patients is usually caused by two episodes of cerebral infarction. However, in pediatric cases, it is frequently caused by herpes encephalitis (1–4), not by a cerebrovascular accident (CVA). Adult cases have been extensively studied but pediatric cases have rarely been reported because the residual hearing of these patients is not well documented from developmental and educational standpoints. We report here the cases of four children with auditory agnosia after herpes encephalitis that were studied from neurotological, neuropsychological, and educational standpoints to determine their differences from adult cases.

Keywords

Auditory Brainstem Response Moyamoya Disease Herpes Simplex Encephalitis Language Disorder Residual Hearing 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer, Tokyo 2009

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