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Bilateral Auditory Cortex and/or Auditory Radiation Lesion and Perception

Abstract

1Severe auditory deficit due to bilateral lesions of the primary auditory cortex or auditory radiation is rare. This serious hearing problem is called “auditory agnosia” or “cortical deafness.” Most studies on humans are single or double case reports (1–6) and have led us to question whether bilateral lesions in the human primary auditory cortex can cause complete deafness. However, in animal experiments, Neff et al. (7) noted that bilateral ablation of the primary auditory cortex does not cause permanent deafness, with preservation of pure-tone thresholds.

Keywords

Auditory Cortex Auditory Brainstem Response Auditory Pathway Bilateral Lesion Primary Auditory Cortex 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer, Tokyo 2009

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