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Brainstem and Midbrain Lesions

Abstract

When viewing drawings of the brainstem auditory pathways, it is easy to imagine that the brainstem is merely a series of telegraph stations relaying messages to the cortex. However, a significant amount of processing occurs at the brainstem level, and lesions can affect higher functions even if not all pathways to the cortex have been severed. There is another aspect of brainstem anatomy. The brainstem is small, the size of a man’s thumb, and all but the tiniest lesions can be expected to affect multiple tracts or nuclei. In this chapter, a range of insults—from the subtle to the fatal—are considered.

Keywords

Cerebral Palsy Auditory Brainstem Response Cochlear Nucleus Dorsal Cochlear Nucleus Inferior Olivary Nucleus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer, Tokyo 2009

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