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Auditory Nerve Lesions

Abstract

The auditory nerve is composed of the cochlear nerve and vestibular nerve, which run, respectively, from the cochlea to the cochlear nucleus and from the vestibular organs to the vestibular nucleus in the medulla oblongata. Because the auditory nerve is confined to the internal auditory canal (IAC) for part of its course, tumors in the IAC may damage the vestibular or cochlear branch no matter from which branch they originate. Unilateral acoustic neuromas are more common, but bilateral acoustic neurofibromas may be found in patients with neurofibromatosis type II.

Keywords

Hair Cell Auditory Nerve Auditory Brainstem Response Outer Hair Cell Vestibular Schwannoma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer, Tokyo 2009

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