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Origins of Evoked Potentials

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Abstract

If evoked potentials are to be of any value in the diagnosis of central lesions, it is necessary to identify the anatomical site that generates the potential. This task is made more difficult because many responses have multiple generators. For example, a particular wave in the auditory brainstem response (ABR) might reflect activity of fourth-order neurons, but there may be fourth-order neurons originating from several sites within the brainstem, ipsilateral and contralateral to the ear being stimulated. There are other complexities as well. Although animal studies are of great value, one cannot be sure that the generators in animals are identical to those in humans. Maturational effects must also be considered in the pediatric population. For example, the middle latency response, which is robust in adults (human or otherwise), is inconsistent or absent in young children.

Keywords

Inferior Colliculus Auditory Brainstem Response Cochlear Nucleus Primary Auditory Cortex Superior Olivary Complex 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer, Tokyo 2009

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