Advertisement

Sika Deer pp 437-452 | Cite as

The Management of Sika Deer Populations in Hyogo Prefecture, Japan

  • Sakata Hiroshi
  • Shin-ichiro Hamasaki
  • Hiromune Mitsuhashi

We describe the present status of sika (Cervus nippon) deer management in Hyogo Prefecture and our efforts to predict the future trend of sika deer populations and agricultural damage for management options. Using monitoring data from 1999 to 2001 we analyzed the relationships between sika deer density, hunting pressure, and damage to agriculture in Hyogo Prefecture. By regression analysis of the changing rate of a density index, we detected a negative relationship to the density index in the preceding year and proportion of urban area of the landscape and a positive relationship to neighboring deer abundance and proportion of agricultural area. Amount of agricultural damage was correlated to deer abundance, proportion of area in forest plantation, and the amount of boundary between cultivated lands and forests. These variables for the area within 2.5 km distance of focal cultivated land explained the amount of damage better than those within 5 km distance. Then, using the derived formula, we could predict the future trend of deer population according to harvesting plans. If 10,000 deer per year were harvested (approximately the harvest in 2001), the deer density and agricultural damages would not be reduced. Even harvesting 20,000 deer for a few years does not seem to reduce the population under the target population of the management plan. The accuracy of this model was examined by comparing the prediction to the monitoring data in the next year. Finally, we discuss the contribution of our effort to the advancement of deer management.

Keywords

Japanese Cedar Sika Deer Deer Population Hunting Season Hunting Pressure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Literature Cited

  1. Dennis, B., and M. L. Taper. 1994. Density dependence in time series observations of natural populations: Estimation and testing. Ecological Monographs 64:205–224CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Hamasaki, S.-I., M. Kishimoto, and H. Sakata. 2007. Evaluation of three monitoring methods for sika deer population density: Block count, pellet group count and sighting per unit effort.Honyurui Kagaku (Mammalian Science) 47:65–71. (In Japanese.)Google Scholar
  3. Hyogo Prefecture Government. 1991. Report of research on sika deer status in 1990. Kobe, Japan.(In Japanese.)Google Scholar
  4. Hyogo Prefecture Government. 1999. Sika deer conservation and management plan. Kobe, Japan.(In Japanese.)Google Scholar
  5. Hyogo Prefecture Government. 2000. Report of research on sika deer status in 1999. Kobe, Japan.(In Japanese.)Google Scholar
  6. Mallows, C. L. 1973. Some remarks of Cp. Technometrics 15:661–675CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Sakata, H., S.-I. Hamasaki, M. Kishimoto, H. Mitsuhashi, A. Mitsuhashi, M. Yokoyama, and M. Mitani. 2001. The relationships between sika deer density, hunting pressure and damage to agriculture in Hyogo Prefecture. Humans and Nature 12:63–72. (In Japanese.)Google Scholar
  8. Sakata, H., S.-I. Hamasaki, H. Mitsuhashi, M. Yokoyama, and M. Mitani. 2002. The examination of plural scenarios for management of sika deer population in Hyogo Prefecture. Humans and Nature 13:21–28. (In Japanese.)Google Scholar
  9. Suzuki, M., H. Sakata, and T. Tanaka. 2003. Dynamics of hunter population in Hyogo Prefecture.Humans and Nature 14:33–41. (In Japanese.)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sakata Hiroshi
    • 1
  • Shin-ichiro Hamasaki
    • 2
  • Hiromune Mitsuhashi
    • 3
  1. 1.Associate Professor, Institute of Natural and Environmental SciencesUniversity of HyogoTanbaJapan
  2. 2.Chief of Kansai BranchWildlife Management OfficeKita-kuJapan
  3. 3.Assistant Professor, Institute of Natural and Environmental SciencesUniversity of HyogoSandaJapan

Personalised recommendations