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Sika Deer pp 405-419 | Cite as

Sika Deer Population Irruptions and Their Management on Hokkaido Island, Japan

  • Hiroyuki Uno
  • Koichi Kaji
  • Katsumi Tamada

Sika deer populations on Hokkaido Island, northern Japan, have often showed irruptive behavior in the recent past. During the last two decades the irrup tion of sika deer has caused extensive agricultural damage and severely affected forest vegetation. In response, in 1998 the Hokkaido government initiated aggres sive population control based on the “Conservation and management plan in eastern Hokkaido.” Since institution of this plan both the sika deer population size indices and the amount of damage have clearly decreased. We consider that decreasing the population size, extending use of net fences, and applying chemical repellents are main contributors to reducing damage.

We recognize that there are many uncertainties with estimating the population param eters and population size and that uncertain information must be replaced with more accurate data. Because the current deer density in eastern Hokkaido remains extremely high, we must continue to control and manipulate sika deer density. Long-term monitor ing and evaluation of population parameters are important. More information is needed as well to evaluate the effects of sika deer population levels on biodiversity.

Keywords

Sika Deer Deer Density Wildlife Society Bulletin Sika Deer Population Spotlight Count 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hiroyuki Uno
    • 1
  • Koichi Kaji
    • 2
  • Katsumi Tamada
    • 3
  1. 1.Nature Conservation DepartmentHokkaido Institute of Environmental SciencesSapporoJapan
  2. 2.Professor, Department of Ecoregion Science, Laboratory of Wildlife ConservationTokyo University of Agriculture and TechnologyFuchuJapan
  3. 3.Researcher, Nature Conservation DepartmentHokkaido Institute of Environmental SciencesSapporoJapan

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