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Emergence of Culture in Wild Chimpanzees: Education by Master-Apprenticeship

  • Tetsuro Matsuzawa
  • Dora Biro
  • Tatyana Humle
  • Noriko Inoue-Nakamura
  • Rikako Tonooka
  • Gen Yamakoshi

Abstract

This chapter describes a series of field experiments aimed at investigating aspects of emergence of cultural traditions in wild chimpanzee communities. Long-term research at a number of sites in Africa has revealed that each community of chimpanzees has developed its unique set of cultural traditions (Boesch and Boesch-Achermann 2000; Goodall 1986; McGrew 1992; Nishida 1990; Whiten et al. 1999). The evidence poses an intriguing question: How did these unique cultures come into existence?.

Keywords

Stone Tool Wild Chimpanzee Stone Hammer Unfamiliar Item Juvenile Chimpanzee 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tetsuro Matsuzawa
    • 1
  • Dora Biro
    • 2
  • Tatyana Humle
    • 3
  • Noriko Inoue-Nakamura
    • 1
  • Rikako Tonooka
    • 1
  • Gen Yamakoshi
    • 4
  1. 1.Primate Research InstituteKyoto UniversityAichiJapan
  2. 2.Department of ZoologyUniversity of OxfordUK
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyUniversity of StirlingUK
  4. 4.Center for African Area StudiesKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan

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