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The Level of Self-Knowledge in Nonhuman Primates: From the Perspective of Comparative Cognitive Science

  • Shoji Itakura

Abstract

The origin of self-knowledge is arguably the most fundamental problem of developmental psychology. Recent progress in the study of infant behavior provides important and new insights regarding the origins of self-knowledge (Rochat 1995).

Keywords

Nonhuman Primate Line Drawing Japanese Macaque Personal Pronoun Japanese Monkey 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shoji Itakura
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychology, Faculty of LettersKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan

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