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Abstract

This chapter provides a summarised account of the journey that was undertaken into real life cases in order to gain a better understanding of organisations and teams in the sub-Saharan African setting. Three organisations were studied in Nigeria and one innovation team in each of these organisations was in the focus of this study.

Keywords

Team Member Team Leader Power Distance Uncertainty Avoidance Performance Orientation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Deutscher Universitäts-Verlag | GWV Fachverlage GmbH, Wiesbaden 2007

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