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Team-Level Innovative Performance in Sub-Saharan Africa

Abstract

Drawing on literature from the areas of teamwork, organisational theory, international business, cross-cultural management, as well as African history, this Chapter develops a multi-level theory concerning the innovative performance of teams in sub- Saharan Africa.

Keywords

Middle East Power Distance Uncertainty Avoidance Organisational Climate African Society 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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