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Blair and Governance

  • R. A. W. Rhodes

Abstract

There is much talk of a ‘Blair Presidency’.1 Although people are not always clear about the meaning of this expression, it commonly refers to the centralisation of power on the prime minister and his office at No. 10 Downing Street. However, even as people tell tales of a centralised Blair presidency, they also tell stories of fragmented British governance; of the unintended consequences and failures of policy making. This chapter explores the paradox between presidential claims and governance failure. It is an exploration of the limits to public leadership.

Keywords

Prime Minister British Government Policy Network Network Governance Governance Failure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Deutscher Universitäts-Verlag | GWV Fachverlage GmbH, Wiesbaden 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. A. W. Rhodes
    • 1
  1. 1.Distinguished Professor of Political Science Director of the Research School of Social SciencesAustralian National UniversityCanberraAustralia

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