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The Problem of Enforcement of Judgments by the Courts

Abstract

Law enforcement, as the last stage of the civil procedure, not only directly affects the rights of the parties, but also the respect for law and the authority of the courts, as well as social stability and economic development. The goal of judgment is to define legal rights among the parties, whereas enforcement of court orders is to realize legal rights, from this point of view, enforcement procedure is the continuation of trial procedure. Law enforcement and its legislature forms an important part of the civil procedure law. The realization of legal rights by law enforcement not only concerns the functioning of the courts, but also the protection of legal rights and the authority of the judiciary.

Keywords

Supra Note Court Order District Court Civil Procedure Judicial Interpretation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Deutscher Universitäts-Verlag/GWV Fachverlage GmbH, Wiesbaden 2006

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