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Conceptual Model and Hypotheses

Abstract

After having discussed alternative theories available to illuminate the question why some academic research units achieve more technology transfer results than others, this chapter will design a conceptual research model on the basis of the theory we identified as best suited to analyze the problem.

Keywords

Market Orientation Risk Taking Entrepreneurial Orientation Corporate Entrepreneurship Original Item 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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