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Abstract

The following chapter presents the operationalization of the research model. First, basic aspects of the operationalization are described, and then the operationalization of the design variables of early warning behavior follows with its two steps, scanning and interpretation. The third paragraph explains the operationalization of the contingency variables. These are environmental uncertainty and managerial attitudes. Finally, the operationalization of success measures used in this work is presented.

Keywords

Early Warning Moral Reasoning Research Model Internal Model Profit Margin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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