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Understanding of Early Warning in Literature and Definition of Important Terms

Abstract

According to the research questions presented above, the analysis focuses on how the individual manager anticipates future risks and chances for the organization. The manager uses the process of early warning. Therefore, the early warning behavior of the individual manager is analyzed. Within this process data and information have to be distinguished. Managers are confronted with general data about the organizational environment. Then, this “[d]ata is given meaning”43 and transformed by interpretation to information relevant for the organization. In order to answer the research questions about the early warning behavior of the individual, first, German literature about early warning is presented and analyzed whether it is suitable for this purpose.

Keywords

Early Warning Weak Signal Early Warning System Important Term Soft Fact 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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