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Conceptual framework: Entrepreneurial-management-competence and its effects on task complexity and the success of new firms

Abstract

The development of NTBFs is not a random phenomenon. The prior chapters delineated three major lines of reasoning about EMC’s effects on the development and the success of new ventures: First, by definition the development of the EMCconcept assumes the relevance of the identified competencies for venture success. Second, the four presented management theories specifically capture development implications of competence. Third, empirical studies found effects of competence related concepts on the development of firms. Based on this theoretical and empirical foundation, in this chapter hypotheses are developed.

Keywords

Conceptual Framework Exploitation Activity Financial Success Management Competence Market Success 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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