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Theories regarding entrepreneurial and management competencies and the development of new technology-based firms

Abstract

After defining the basic concepts of this study, this chapter serves to discuss theoretical approaches which investigate 1) entrepreneurial management competencies in the context of young technological ventures, 2) new venture development models, and 3) the relationship between entrepreneurial management competencies and the development of NTBFs.

Keywords

Human Capital Theoretical Foundation Social Competence Entrepreneurial Orientation Human Capital Approach 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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