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Abstract

Entrepreneurial efforts are a fundamental driving force for the prosperity of modern societies. The Global Entrepreneurship Monitor illustrates that almost half of the differences in economic growth of developed nations can be explained by the level of entrepreneurial activity within these countries.1 Countries with higher level of entrepreneurial activities experience significantly higher economic welfare.2

Keywords

Partial Least Square Entrepreneurial Activity Global Entrepreneurship Monitor Entrepreneurship Research Management Competence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Deutscher Universitäts-Verlag | GWV Fachverlage GmbH, Wiesbaden 2007

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