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Review of Empirical Research within RBT

Abstract

As outlined in chapter 2, the importance of firm resources for gaining rents, i.e., the RBT, seems no longer questionable in theory, but empirical evidence on its role in strategic management is still in progress. In other words, RBT has become theoretically established in strategic management, yet, the question where we empirically stand is still to be resolved.246 Whether the central propositions of RBT withstand — overall — empirical testing is still a question unanswered, as is the query whether these empirical results might even revise RBT in general.

Keywords

Firm Performance Information Asymmetry Internal Audit Strategic Resource Intangible Resource 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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