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Abstract

This study aims to explore the role of management accounting systems in strategic sensemaking. In particular the study tries to improve understanding regarding how managers use management accounting systems for sensemaking and how management accounting system dimensions shape the role and use of management accounting system in strategic sensemaking. Due to the explorative nature of the research questions, and the objective of studying strategic sensemaking in its natural setting, the empirical approach is based on a multiple-case study design.

Keywords

Middle Manager Case Study Research Balance Scorecard Strategic Issue Interview Partner 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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