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Innovation and the Open Innovation concept

Abstract

Theory and practice of innovation management lack a clear and generally accepted notion of the term ‘innovation’. On the one hand, literature on innovation management has created a plethora of definitions. Depending on particular research issues, different criteria to describe innovation have been used29. However, the scientific discussion is still far from reaching common agreement. Corporate practice, on the other hand, reveals a similar picture. Notwithstanding interfirm differences in defining innovation, even employees working within the same department of a firm do not necessarily share the same understanding of the term innovation30, often confusing it with invention31.

Keywords

Innovation Process Open Innovation Absorptive Capacity Business Unit Radical Innovation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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