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Collaborations and Partnerships

  • Heike Schirmer
  • Heather Cameron
Chapter

Zusammenfassung

Learning goals

Upon completing this chapter, you should be able to accomplish the following:
  • Describe different reasons for social entrepreneurs to form and participate in partnerships.

  • Describe different types of partners for social entrepreneurs and their particular advantages.

  • Explain different dimensions of collaborative value chain integration and specific types of collaboration.

  • Recognize potential risks and challenges for social entrepreneurs when working together with other entities.

  • Explain how a collaboration can be established.

Keywords

Social Enterprise Strategic Alliance Social Entrepreneurship Social Entrepreneur Social Innovation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Further Reading

  1. [1]
    Austin, J.E. (2003), “Strategic alliances: managing the collaboration portfolio”, in Stanford Social Innovation Review, vol. 1, no. 2, pp. 48–55.Google Scholar
  2. [2]
    Drayton, B. and Budinich, V. (2010), “A new alliance for global change”, in Harvard Business Review, vol. 12, no. 5, pp. 56–64.Google Scholar
  3. [3]
    Social Edge (2011), “Rethinking partnerships”, online: http://www.socialedge.org/discussions/business-models/rethinking-partnerships, accessed date: 11/11/2011.
  4. [4]
    Volery, T. and Hackl, V. (2010), “The promise of social franchising as a model to achieve social goals”, in Fayolle, A. and Matlay, H. (eds.), Handbook of research on social entrepreneurship, Edward Elgar, Cheltenham.Google Scholar
  5. [5]
    Wei-Skillern, J., Austin, J.E., Leonard, H. and Stevenson, H. (2007), Entrepreneurship in the social sector, Sage Publications, Los Angeles.Google Scholar

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Copyright information

© Gabler Verlag | Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Heike Schirmer
    • 1
  • Heather Cameron
    • 1
  1. 1.Freie Universität BerlinBerlinGermany

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