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Social Entrepreneurship in the Market System

  • Marc Grünhagen
  • Holger Berg
Chapter

Zusammenfassung

Learning goals

Upon completing this chapter, you should be able to accomplish the following:
  • Explain the potential role of social entrepreneurship in market economies.

  • Recognize the function of social entrepreneurs in addition to commercial entrepreneurs and the state as suppliers of goods and services.

  • Explain the scope of activity of social enterprises in relation to their potential for value creation and appropriation.

  • Characterize typical areas of activity of social entrepreneurs and provide examples.

Keywords

Corporate Social Responsibility Business Model Fair Trade Social Enterprise Social Entrepreneurship 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Further Reading

  1. [1]
    Nicholls, A. (2010), “The Legitimacy of Social Entrepreneurship: Reflexive Isomorphism in a Pre- Paradigmatic Field”, in Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, vol. 34, no. 4, pp. 611–633.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. [2]
    Santos, F.M. (2009), “A Positive Theory of Social Entrepreneurship”, INSEAD Faculty & Research Working Paper, 2009/23/EFE/ISIC.Google Scholar
  3. [3]
    Swedberg, R. (2011), “Schumpeter’s full model of entrepreneurship: economic, non-economic and social entrepreneurship”, in Ziegler, R. (ed.), An introduction to social entrepreneurship, Edward Elgar, Cheltenham, pp. 77–106.Google Scholar
  4. [4]
    Zahra, S.A., Gedajlovic, E., Neubaum, D.O. and Shulman, J.M. (2009), “A typology of social entrepreneurs: Motives, search processes and ethical challenges”, in Journal of Business Venturing, vol. 24, no. 5, pp. 519–532.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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Copyright information

© Gabler Verlag | Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marc Grünhagen
    • 1
  • Holger Berg
    • 1
  1. 1.Schumpeter School of Business and EconomicsUniversity of WuppertalWuppertalGermany

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