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Background, Characteristics and Context of Social Entrepreneurship

  • Christine K. Volkmann
  • Kim Oliver Tokarski
  • Kati Ernst
Chapter

Zusammenfassung

Learning goals

Upon completing this chapter, you should be able to accomplish the following:
  • Understand the evolution and historical background of social entrepreneurship.

  • Understand the role of social entrepreneurship in societies, economies and politics.

  • Get first insights into social entrepreneurship research.

Keywords

Corporate Social Responsibility Market Orientation Social Enterprise Social Entrepreneurship Social Entrepreneur 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Further Reading

  1. [1]
    Bornstein, D. and Davis, S. (2010), Social entrepreneurship: what everyone needs to know, Oxford Univ. Press, Oxford.Google Scholar
  2. [2]
    Dacin, P.A., Dacin, M.T. and Matear, M. (2010), “Social Entrepreneurship: Why We Don’t Need a New Theory and How We Move Forward From Here”, in Academy of Management Perspectives, vol. 24, no. 3, pp. 37–57.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. [3]
    Dees, J.G. (2010), Creating Large-Scale Change: Not ‘Can’ But ‘How’, What Matters, McKinsey & Company, New York.Google Scholar
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    Nicholls, A. (ed.) (2006), Social Entrepreneurship. New Models of Sustainable Social Change, Oxford University Press, Oxford.Google Scholar
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    Nicholls, A. (2010), “The Legitimacy of Social Entrepreneurship: Reflexive Isomorphism in a Pre- Paradigmatic Field”, in Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, vol. 34, issue 4, pp. 611–633.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. [6]
    Zahra, S.A., Gedajlovic, E., Neubaum, D.O. and Shulman, J.M (2009), “A typology of social entrepreneurs: Motives, search processes and ethical challenges”, in Journal of Business Venturing, vol. 24, no. 5, pp. 519–532.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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Copyright information

© Gabler Verlag | Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christine K. Volkmann
    • 1
  • Kim Oliver Tokarski
    • 2
  • Kati Ernst
    • 1
  1. 1.Schumpeter School of Business and EconomicsUniversity of WuppertalWuppertalGermany
  2. 2.Faculty of BusinessBern University of Applied SciencesBernGermany

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