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The Relevance of Life Changing Situations for Media Usage and their Relevance as a Segmentation Strategy for Media Companies and Advertisers

  • Andrea Leopold
  • Sandra Diehl

Abstract

Nowadays it is impossible to go through daily life without the use of media; the patterns of our daily lives are determined by and intertwined with media use. But what happens to daily routines and media usage when an event occurs that drastically changes the circumstances of our lives? Peoples´ lives can be transformed by major changes: some might be intentional, such as occupational changes or relocations, e.g. leaving the parental home for the first time; other changes may happen unintentionally, e.g. illnesses or the death of relatives or loved ones. How can such a situation of change be understood or constructed? What happens to the daily routines of the people affected? What do they require in order to cope with the changed situation? Which challenges are they confronted with? How can life changing situations be operationalized by media companies and advertisers? How can they support individuals in life changing situations?

Keywords

Daily Routine Consumer Research Media Usage Media Company Market Segmentation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Gabler Verlag | Springer Fachmedien Wiesbaden GmbH 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrea Leopold
    • 1
  • Sandra Diehl
    • 1
  1. 1.University of KlagenfurtAustria

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