Advertisement

The Legal Conflict between Security and Privacy in Addressing Crime and Terrorism on the Internet

  • Murdoch Watney

Abstract

Internet security aimed at addressing terrorism and crime is not only a technological issue, it invariably impacts on the legal system, such as the right to privacy. Many information security professionals focus on security and pay little or no regard to the privacy rights of the Internet user whereas the opposite can be said of privacy activists. Countries face the challenge of applying new approaches to the Internet in the prevention, detection and investigation of crime and terrorism and the prosecution of the perpetrator. Commission of crimes and terrorism as well as securing the Internet against terrorism and other crimes result in a conflict between security, a technical issue and privacy, a legal aspect. A perplexing question is whether an Internet user can expect online privacy and whether globalisation in respect of the use of the Internet and the approaches in combating crime and especially terrorism have not resulted in an online environment that is incompatible with privacy rights.

Keywords

European Union Internet User Privacy Protection Data Retention Internet Service Provider 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. [Agra02]
    Agranoff, Michael: E-mail: Balancing Corporate Assets and Employee Privacy; The Privacy Papers: Policies for Secure Personal Data. In: R. Herold: The Privacy Papers Managing Technology, Consumer, Employee, and Legislative Actions. CRC Press LLC, USA, 2002, p. 5 and 41–42.Google Scholar
  2. [Bowr05]
    Bowrey, Kathy: Law and Internet Culture. Cambridge University Press, 2005, p. 8–9, 194–197.Google Scholar
  3. [Dave06]
    Daves, Nic: A right to privacy? Get over it. In: http://www.mg.co.za/printPage.aspx?area=/insight/in-sight_comment_and_analysis/&art... (May 23, 2006).Google Scholar
  4. [Carr03]
    Carr, Indira: Anonymity, the Internet and Criminal Law Issues. In: C. Nicoll, JEJ Prins and van Dellen, MJM: TMC Asser Press, The Hague, 2003, p. 188.Google Scholar
  5. [Deig03]
    Deighton, John: Market Solutions to Privacy Problems? In: C. Nicoll, JEJ Prins and van Dellen, MJM: TMC Asser Press, The Hague, 2003, p. 137, 140.Google Scholar
  6. [EdHo03]
    Edwards Lilian and Howells, Geraint: Digital Anonymity and the Law. In: C. Nicoll, JEJ Prins and van Dellen, MJM: TMC Asser Press, The Hague, 2003, p. 208–209, 214, 216–217, 228–239, 245.Google Scholar
  7. [E1BC06]
    Eleftheriou, Demetrios; Berliri, Marco and Coraggio, Giulio: Data Protection and E-Commerce in the United States and the European Union. In: The International Lawyer, Vol 40, No 2, 2006, p. 398–400.Google Scholar
  8. [Flin06]
    Flint, David: Don’t be Evil. In: Business Law Review, April 2006, p. 102–104.Google Scholar
  9. [GoDu03]
    Goemans, Caroline and Dumortier, Jos: Enforcement Issues — Mandatory Retention of Traffic Data in the EU: Possible Impact on Privacy and On-line Anonymity. In: Nicoll, C; Prins J. E. J. and van Dellen, M.J.M: Digital Anonymity and the Law. TMC Asser Press, The Hague, 2003, p. 161, 164, 167–169, 172–183.Google Scholar
  10. [HiCo02]
    Hiller, Janine and Cohen, Ronnie: Internet Law and Policy. Pearson Education, Inc., New Jersey, 2002, p.75–76, 95, 98–100, 169, 170–171.Google Scholar
  11. [Lyon03]
    Lyon, David: Surveillance after September 11. Polity Press, Cambridge, 2003, p. 15, 29, 89, 109–112.Google Scholar
  12. [McCu06]
    McCullagh, Declan: America debates data retention. In: http://insight.zdnet.co.uk/,39020415,39263973,00.htm. (April 18, 2006).Google Scholar
  13. [McC176]
    McClellan, Grant S: The Right to Privacy. HW Wilson Company, New York, 1976, p. 3, 14, 25.Google Scholar
  14. [Morp06]
    Morphy, Erica: AG wants law compelling ISPs to hold customer Data. In: http://www.exommerce-times.com/story/53’42.html?u=crbuysc&p=ENNSS_0be3ald63b9517... (30 September 2006).Google Scholar
  15. [Nico03]
    Nicoll, Chris: Digital Anonymity and the Law. In: C. Nicoll, J.E.J. Prins and M.J.M. van Dellen. TMC Asser Press, The Hague, 2003, p. 116–119.Google Scholar
  16. [Pain06]
    Pain, Julian: Let’s not forget 10 September 2001. In: http://www.rsf.org/article.php3?id_article=10760 (June 12, 2006).Google Scholar
  17. [Poor02]
    Poore, Ralph, Spencer: Computer Forensics and Privacy: At what price do we police the Internet? In: R. Herold: The Privacy Papers Managing Technology, Consumer, Employee, and Legislative Actions. CRC Press LLC, USA, 2002, p. 33–34.Google Scholar
  18. [RuDa02]
    Rustad, Michael and Daftary, Cyrus: E-Business Legal Handbook. Aspen Publishers, Inc, New York, 2002, p. 5–6.Google Scholar
  19. [Schu05]
    Schulz, Eugene: Personal information comprises: It is time for the U.S. Government to wake up. In: Computers and Security, 2005, p. 261–262.Google Scholar
  20. [Watn03]
    Watney, Murdoch: Criminal and Procedural Aspects in the Prevention of Cyber Crime. In: Journal of South African Law. JUTA, South Africa, 2003, p. 56–74, 241–257.Google Scholar
  21. [Watn06]
    Watney, Murdoch: Regulation of Internet Pornography in South Africa. In: Journal of Contemporary Roman Dutch Law, Butterworths, South Africa, 2006, p. 227–237, 381–395.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Friedr. Vieweg & Sohn Verlag | GWV Fachverlage GmbH, Wiesbaden 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Murdoch Watney
    • 1
  1. 1.University of JohannesburgSouth Africa

Personalised recommendations