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Simple & Secure: Attitude and behaviour towards security and usability in internet products and services at home

  • Reinder Wolthuis
  • Gerben Broenink
  • Frank Fransen
  • Sven Schultz
  • Arnout de Vries

Abstract

This paper is the result of research on the security perception of users in ICT services and equipment. We analyze the rationale of users to have an interest in security and to decide to change security parameters of equipment and services. We focus on the home environment, where more and more devices are (inter)connected to form a complex end-to-end chain in using online services. In our research, we constructed a model to determine the delta between the perceived overall security and the real security in home networks. To achieve an understanding of perception and how to identify the delta between perceived and real security, our work forms the basis for examining how perception relates to behaviour. Since humans are referred to as the weakest link in security, there are also differences in behaviour and desired behaviour from a security perspective.

Keywords

Home Network User Acceptance Network Provider Security Solution Secure Socket Layer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Vieweg+Teubner | GWV Fachverlage GmbH 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Reinder Wolthuis
  • Gerben Broenink
  • Frank Fransen
  • Sven Schultz
    • 1
  • Arnout de Vries
    • 1
  1. 1.Innovation and User Experience ManagementTNO Information and Communication TechnologyGroningenThe Netherlands

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