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Endoscopic radial artery harvest

  • R. H. Miles
  • R. E. Kollpainter

Abstract

The use of the radial artery as a conduit in coronary bypass surgery was first described by Carpentier et al., in 1973 [3]. This initial experience detailed 30 patients, in whom 40 radial arteries were utilized. Short-term results were encouraging with patency rates greater than 90% in grafts 1 to 10 months after implant. However, the radial artery was essentially abandoned when mid-term results (at 2 years) revealed that approximately one-third of the radial artery grafts displayed “severe generalized stenosis” [4, 5]. These results were attributed to traumatic harvesting techniques and the predilection of spasm in the radial artery [3, 5].

Keywords

Radial Artery Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Side Branch Ulnar Artery Stab Incision 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. H. Miles
  • R. E. Kollpainter

There are no affiliations available

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