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Marketization and Informalization of Health Care Services in Mega-Urban China

  • Tabea Bork
  • Bettina Gransow
  • Frauke Kraas
  • Yuan Yuan
Chapter
Part of the Contributions to Statistics book series (CONTRIB.STAT.)

Abstract

Introduction of the market, privatization and decentralization have been the dominant corner stones throughout the first two decades of China’s reform line after the introduction of the open door policy in 1978. Many China researchers (e.g. Wang 2008; Wu 2008) thereby judge, that China’s development path was not merely a transition from planned economy to market-oriented economy, but that a “market society” emerged, in which market principles permeate also noneconomic arenas and “threatened to become the dominant mechanism integrating all of society (and even political life)” (Wang 2008: 18). The marketization of the health sector thereby entailed that social security schemes and therewith financing of public health care collapsed almost completely and out-of-pocket payment became the dominant factor defining people’s access to health care.

Keywords

Health Care Provider Health Sector Migrant Worker Pearl River Delta Health Care Sector 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tabea Bork
    • 1
  • Bettina Gransow
    • 2
    • 3
  • Frauke Kraas
    • 1
  • Yuan Yuan
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of GeographyCologne UniversityCologneGermany
  2. 2.Seminar of East Asian StudiesFree University BerlinBerlinGermany
  3. 3.School of Sociology and AnthropologySun Yat-sen UniversityGuangzhouChina

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