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WTP Analysis of Mobile Internet Demand

  • Paul Rappoport
  • Lester D. Taylor
  • James Alleman
Part of the Contributions to Economics book series (CE)

Abstract

Pricing new services is a mostly trial and error process, and wireless Internet access is no exception. Additionally, judging by recent publication, wireless Internet pricing and consumer willingness to pay (WTP) is the subject of much interest. In particular, (2002) indicates wireless Internet provider expectations have not been met by realized market demand. Maier further argues that this disappointing consumer response is caused by complicated service provider pricing schemes. However, CNET News.com considers that while complex pricing is an impediment to market growth, it is not the only problem, viz.

Keywords

Contingent Valuation Consumer Surplus Elasticity Estimate Access Price Personal Communication Service 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Rappoport
    • 1
  • Lester D. Taylor
    • 2
  • James Alleman
    • 3
  1. 1.College of Business and Public AdministrationUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA
  2. 2.College of Engineering & Applied Science, University of ColoradoBoulderUSA
  3. 3.Economics Department, School of Business and ManagementTemple UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

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