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Research Design and Research Methodology

  • Patrick Heinecke
Chapter
Part of the Contributions to Management Science book series (MANAGEMENT SC.)

Abstract

The research design and research methodology of this work is oriented on the theoretically derived latent variables of the regional success factor model, and its respective measurement models, which we presented in the previous chapters. For the measurement of these latent constructs, in addition to utilizing secondary data, the use of primary data is highly encouraged to improve methodological rigor (Bergh et al. 2006: 91; Yang et al. 2006: 603) – as this contributes to avoiding a common method bias (Chang et al. 2010: 179; Homburg and Klarmann 2009: 149; Podsakoff et al. 2003: 882). Due to the fact that methodological rigor – according to our explanations in Sect. 2.4.1 – represents a necessary condition for achieving “high” rigor, we will apply both data sources in this work. Here, secondary data is related to the more “objective” firm-level data, whereas primary data focuses on the “subjective” experimental, cultural, and knowledge (or information) related variables (Buckley et al. 2007: 1071; Hult et al. 2008a: 1066; Venkatraman and Ramanujam 1986: 804). In this work, the former is given by a database with firm-level information about MNCs, whereas the latter corresponds to a survey-based inquiry of these firms. In the following chapter, we will present this database of our research sample – before we will outline in the subsequent chapter the research methodology for our survey-based research, as well as for the explorative analysis and modeling of our data.

Keywords

Regional Strategy International Financial Reporting Standard Sample Firm Regional Success Research Sample 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Physica-Verlag Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patrick Heinecke
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Erlangen-NürnbergErlangenGermany

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