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Introduction

  • Patrick Heinecke
Chapter
Part of the Contributions to Management Science book series (MANAGEMENT SC.)

Abstract

In his seminal book, the Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith (1776) recognizes an important influence from the extent of the market on the competitiveness of firms (Tribe 1995: 24, 26). Nowadays Multinational Corporations (MNCs), the world’s largest companies, face an enormous extent of the market, as nearly all of them operate around the globe. To be competitive on a worldwide level, their design of successful strategies becomes a very challenging task. It involves addressing the differing needs of globally dispersed customers in multiple environments. In the past, the extant research in International Management has widely discussed two opposing approaches to deal with this complexity: the concepts of global integration and local responsiveness (Bartlett 1986; Bartlett and Ghoshal 1989; Doz 1980, 1986; Prahalad 1976; Prahalad and Doz 1987)

Keywords

Regional Strategy Success Factor Performance Relationship Regional Success National Contour 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Physica-Verlag Heidelberg 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patrick Heinecke
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Erlangen-NürnbergErlangenGermany

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