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Strategic Approaches to Payment Efficiency and Innovation

  • Tanai Khiaonarong
  • Jonathan Liebenau
Chapter
Part of the Contributions to Economics book series (CE)

Abstract

We discuss the strategic approaches for promoting payment efficiency and innovations, including the minimalist, competitive and public service approaches. The cases show how strategies are developed under unique environments of advanced and emerging banking systems and compare the involvement of the central bank and the private sector in payment operations by illustrating how ownership, pricing policies, and cost recovery may vary, and how such factors may influence efficiency and innovation in terms of changes in paper-based and electronic payment market shares.

Keywords

Central Bank Commercial Bank Payment System Settlement System Payment Service 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Physica-Verlag Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Westminster and Bank of ThailandPranakhonThailand
  2. 2.Department of Management Information Systems and Innovation GroupLondon School of Economics and Political ScienceLondonUK

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