Advertisement

Topics for Comparative Research on Operating Hours in the EU

  • Lei Delsen
  • Frank Bauer
  • Gilbert Cette
  • Mark Smith
Chapter
Part of the Contributions to Economics book series (CE)

This volume is the second book based on comparative and comprehensive data from the 2003 representative European Union Company survey of Operating hours, Working times and Employment (EUCOWE) in France, Germany, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain and the United Kingdom. This publication complements and builds on the first book published in 2007 in which the methodology and the descriptive national findings, as well as some first comparative analytical results, of the EUCOWE project were presented.1 In several of the countries studied the survey represented one of the first dedicated studies on the operating time. The EUCOWE survey was the first attempt to collect cross-national comparative data on operating hours and opening times and as such represents an innovative source of information of working patterns, establishment behaviour and competitiveness in the EU.

At the firm and industry level, as well as the macroeconomic level, operating hours are one of the essential determinants of productivity and competitiveness not to mention the standard of living of the wider population.2 In essence operating hours, opening times and service hours can be considered as central to the behaviour of establishments in relation to their clients and, as a result, the organisation of employment and working time of their employees. The extent to which organisations are required to serve clients within and outside “normal” working hours will also help shape the duration and intensity of utilisation of capital. While establishments will have some freedom in determining how they deal with their specific operating time requirements, and any fluctuations within those hours, they will also be subject to regulation and policy at the national and pan-national level. Thus operating hours are central to policy debates at both the European and national level. Concerns over the competitiveness of European firms and the reconciliation of work and family life are all impacted upon by operating hours of the establishments where employees work.

Keywords

Service Sector Shift Work Capacity Utilisation Comparative Research Establishment Size 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Anxo, D., G. Bosch, D. Bosworth and G. Cette (1995) Work Patterns and Capital Utilisation – An International Comparative Study, Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.Google Scholar
  2. Anxo, D. (2002) Capital operating time in Swedish manufacturing: Recent developments, in: F. Bauer, H. Groß and G. Sieglen (eds.) Operating hours in Europe, Berichte des ISO 66, Köln: Institut zur Erforschung sozialer Chancen: 181–196.Google Scholar
  3. Bauer, F., H. Groß, K. Lehmann and E. Munz (2004) Arbeitszeit 2003. Arbeitszeitgestaltung. Arbeitsorganisation und Tätigkeitsprofile, Berichte des ISO 70, Köln: Institut zur Erforschung sozialer Chancen.Google Scholar
  4. Bauer, F., H. Groβ and G. Sieglen (eds.) (2002) Operating hours in Europe, Berichte des ISO 66, Köln: Institut zur Erforschung sozialer Chancen.Google Scholar
  5. Bauer, F., H. Groß and G. Sieglen (2007) Methodology of the EUCOWE Project, in: L. Delsen, D. Bosworth, H. Groß and R. Muñoz de Bustillo y Llorente (eds.) Operating Hours and Working Times. A Survey of Capacity Utilisation and Employment in the European Union, Heidelberg: Physica Verlag, 21–40Google Scholar
  6. Bautista, R. M., Hughes, H., Lim, D. Morawetz and F. Thoumi (1981) Capital Utilization in Manufacturing: Colombia, Israel, Malaysia and the Philippines, New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  7. Betancourt, R. R. and C. K. Clague (1981) Capital Utilization: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  8. Blyton, P., J. Hassard, S. Hill and K. Starkey (1989) Time, work and organization, London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  9. Delsen, L., D. Bosworth, H. Groß and R. Muñoz de Bustillo y Llorente (eds.) (2007) Operating Hours and Working Times. A Survey of Capacity Utilisation and Employment in the European Union, Heidelberg: Physica Verlag.Google Scholar
  10. Dupaigne, M. (2000) Capital utilization and the willingness to rest: A general equilibrium analysis, Econometric Society World Congress 2000 Contributed Papers 0391, Econometric Society, August 11–16, Seattle.Google Scholar
  11. Dupaigne, M. (2001) Capital utilization and work schedules: the welfare costs of shiftworking, Economics Letters, (73): 195–200.Google Scholar
  12. EC (1991) Developments on the Labour Market in the Community. Results of a Survey Covering Employers and Employees, European Economy, 47, Brussels/Luxembourg: European Commission, Directorate-General for Economic and Financial Affairs.Google Scholar
  13. EC (1995) Performance of the European Union labour market. Results of an ad hoc labour market survey covering employers and employees, European Economy, Reports and Studies No. 3, Brussels/Luxembourg: European Commission, Directorate-General for Economic and Financial Affairs.Google Scholar
  14. Foss, M. (1963) The utilization of capital equipment. Postwar compared with prewar, Survey of Current Business, June, 43 (6): 8–16.Google Scholar
  15. Foss, M. (1981) Changes in the Workweek of Fixed Capital: U.S. Manufacturing, 1929 to 1976, Washington: American Enterprise Institute.Google Scholar
  16. Foss, M. (1997) Shiftwork, Capital Hours and Productivity Change, Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.Google Scholar
  17. Freyssinet, J. and F. Michon (2003) Overtime in Europe, EIROnline, February, Dublin: European Foundation for the Improvement of Living and Working Conditions.Google Scholar
  18. Heiler, K. (1998) The “Petty Pilfering of Minutes” or What has Happened to the Length of the Working Day in Australia?, International Journal of Manpower, 19 (4): 266–280.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Hamermesh, D. S. (1996) Who works when? Evidence from the US and Germany, NBER Working Papers 5855, Cambridge: National Bureau of Economic Research.Google Scholar
  20. Hamermesh, D. S. (1998) When we work, American Economic Review, 88 (2): 321–325.Google Scholar
  21. Lehndorff, S. (2000) Working time and operating hours in the European automotive industry, Gelsenkirchen: Institut Arbeit und Technik.Google Scholar
  22. Marris, R. (1964) The Economics of Capital Utilization, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  23. Pannenberg, M. (2005) Long-term effects of unpaid overtime. Evidence for West Germany, Scottish Journal of Political Economy, 52 (2): 177–193.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Physica-Verlag Heidelberg 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lei Delsen
    • 1
  • Frank Bauer
    • 2
  • Gilbert Cette
    • 3
  • Mark Smith
    • 4
  1. 1.Nijmegen School of Management Dept. EconomicsRadboud University NijmegenNijmegenNetherlands
  2. 2.DüsseldorfGermany
  3. 3.Centre de Recherche UABanque de FranceParisFrance
  4. 4.Grenoble Ecole de ManagementGrenobleFrance

Personalised recommendations