Advertisement

Neocharismatic Leadership

  • Ingo Winkler
Chapter
Part of the Contributions to Management Science book series (MANAGEMENT SC.)

Abstract

The neocharismatic leadership approach basically deals with the process of change and consequently the transformation of followers. This process contains charismatic and visionary aspects which are especially understood as located in the characteristics and subsequent patterns of behavior of the leading person. “(Leadership) must be visionary; it must transform those who see the vision, and give them a new and stronger sense of purpose and meaning” (Van Seters and Field 1990, p. 38). Resulting from that idea the main research focus of scholars adopting the perspective of this theoretical approach is on how to distinguish charismatic from “ordinary” leaders and on how charismatic or transformational leaders affect followers. The neocharismatic leadership research can be divided into several approaches (e.g., House et al. 1998; Bryman 1992; Yukl 2006). The syllable “neo” in the title of this theoretical approach means, firstly, that this research is advancing explicitly or implicitly the early charisma concept of Max Weber and, secondly, that the concept of charisma is now applied to private organizations in addition to its early application to religious or political movements.

Keywords

Transformational Leadership Leadership Behavior Implicit Theory Charismatic Leadership Contingent Reward 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Avolio BJ, Bass BM (1987) Transformational leadership, charisma, and beyond. In: Hunt JG, Baliga BR, Dachler HP, Schriesheim CA (eds) Emerging leadership vistas. Lexington Books, Lexington, pp 29–50Google Scholar
  2. Avolio BJ, Gardner WL (2005) Authentic leadership development: getting to the root of positive forms of leadership. Leadersh Q 16(3):315–338CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Awamleh R, Gardner W (1999) Perceptions of leader charisma and effectiveness: the effects of vision content, delivery, and organizational performance. Leadersh Q 10(3):345–373CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Barbuto JE (1997) Taking the charisma out of transformational leadership. J Soc Behav Pers 12(3):689–698Google Scholar
  5. Barling J, Weber T, Kelloway EK (1996) Effects of transformational leadership training and attitudinal and fiscal outcomes: a field experiment. J Appl Psychol 81(6):827–832CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Bass BM (1982) Intensity of relation, dyadic-group considerations, cognitive categorization, and transformational leadership. In: Hunt JG, Sekaran U, Schriesheim CA (eds) Leadership beyond established views. Southern Illinois University Press, Carbondale, IL, pp 142–150Google Scholar
  7. Bass BM (1985) Leadership and performance beyond expectations. Free Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  8. Bass BM (1990b) From transactional to transformational leadership: learning to share the vision. Organ Dyn 18(3):19–31CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Bass BM (1995) Comment: transformational leadership. J Manag Inquiry 4(3):293–298CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Bass BM (1998) Transformational leadership: industry, military and educational impact. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Mahwah, NJGoogle Scholar
  11. Bass BM (1999) Two decades of research and development in transformational leadership. Eur J Work Organ Psychol 8(1):9–32CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Bass BM, Avolio BJ (1990) The implications of transactional and transformational leadership for individual, team, and organizational development. In: Pasmore WA, Woodman RW (eds) Research in organizational change and development. JAI Press, Greenwich, CT, pp 231–272Google Scholar
  13. Bass BM, Avolio BJ (1993) Transformational leadership: a response to critiques. In: Chemers M, Ayman R (eds) Leadership theory and research: perspectives and research directions. Academic, San Diego, CA, pp 49–80Google Scholar
  14. Bass BM, Avolio BJ (1994) Introduction. In: Bass BM, Avolio BJ (eds) Improving organizational effectiveness through transformational leadership. Sage, Thousand Oaks, CA, pp 1–9Google Scholar
  15. Bennis WG, Nanus B (1985) Leaders: the strategies for taking charge. Harper & Row, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  16. Beyer JM (1999) Taming and promoting charisma to change organizations. Leadersh Q 10(2):307–330CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Boal KB, Bryson JM (1987) Charismatic leadership: a phenomenological and structural approach. In: Hunt JG, Baliga BR, Dachler HP, Schriesheim CA (eds) Emerging leadership vistas. Lexington Books, Lexington, pp 11–28Google Scholar
  18. Bryman A (1992) Charisma & leadership in organizations. Sage, LondonGoogle Scholar
  19. Burns JM (1978) Leadership. Harper & Row, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  20. Campbell SM, Ward AJ, Sonnenfeld JA, Agle BR (2008) Relational ties that bind: leader–follower relationship dimensions and charismatic attribution. Leadersh Q 19(5):556–568CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Conger JA (1989) The charismatic leader: behind the mystique of exceptional leadership. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CAGoogle Scholar
  22. Conger JA, Kanungo R (1987) Toward a behavioral theory of charismatic leadership in organizational settings. Acad Manage Rev 12(4):637–647CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Conger JA, Kanungo R (1988) The charismatic leader. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CAGoogle Scholar
  24. Den Hartog DN, House RJ, Hanges PJ, Ruiz-Quintanilla SA, Dorfman PW (1999) Culture specific and cross-culturally generalizable implicit leadership theories: are attributes of charismatic/ transformational leadership universally endorsed? Leadersh Q 10(2):219–257CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Dorian BJ, Dunbar C, Frayn D, Garfinkel PE (2000) Charismatic leadership, boundary issues, and collusion. Am J Psychother 54(2):216–226Google Scholar
  26. Gingrich, P. (1999) Power, domination, legitimation, and authority. Resource document. University of Regina, Department of Sociology and Social Studies. http://uregina.ca/~gingrich/o12f99.htm. Accessed 25 October 2007
  27. House RJ (1977) A 1976 theory of charismatic leadership. In: Hunt JG, Larson LL (eds) Leadership: the cutting edge. Southern Illinois University Press, Carbondale, IL, pp 189–205Google Scholar
  28. House RJ, Delbecq A, Taris TW (1998) Value based leadership: an integrated theory and an empirical test. Unpublished manuscriptGoogle Scholar
  29. House RJ, Hanges PJ (2004) Research design. In: House RJ, Hanges PJ, Javidan M, Dorfman PW, Gupta V (eds) Culture, leadership, and organizations: the GLOBE study of 62 societies. Sage, Thousand Oaks, CA, pp 95–101Google Scholar
  30. House RJ, Hanges PJ, Ruiz-Quintanilla SA, Dorfman PW, Javidan M, Dickson MW, Gupta V, GLOBE (1999) Cultural influences on leadership and organizations: project GLOBE. In: Mobley WH, Gessner MJ, Arnold V (eds) Advances in global leadership. JAI-Press, Stamford, CN, pp 171–233Google Scholar
  31. House RJ, Hanges PJ, Javidan M, Dorfman PW, Gupta V (2004) Culture, leadership, and organizations: the GLOBE study of 62 societies. Sage, Thousand Oaks, CAGoogle Scholar
  32. House RJ, Javidan M (2004) Overview of GLOBE. In: House RJ, Hanges PJ, Javidan M, Dorfman PW, Gupta V (eds) Culture, leadership, and organizations: the GLOBE study of 62 societies. Sage, Thousand Oaks, CA, pp 9–28Google Scholar
  33. Howell JM, Avolio BJ (1993) Transformational leadership, transactional leadership, locus of control and support for innovation: key predictors of consolidated-business-unit performance. J Appl Psychol 78(6):891–902CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Howell JM, Shamir B (2005) The role of followers in the charismatic leadership process: Relationships and their consequences. Academy of Management Review 30(1):96–112Google Scholar
  35. Hughes RL, Ginnett RC, Curphy GJ (1996) Leadership. Enhancing the lessons of experience. Irwin, ChicagoGoogle Scholar
  36. Jordan DJ (1998) Leadership: the state of the research. Parks Recreation 33(10):32–40Google Scholar
  37. Kezar AJ, Carducci R, Contreras-McGavin M (2006) Rethinking the "L" word in higher education: the revolution in research on leadership. Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CAGoogle Scholar
  38. Kirkbride P (2006) Developing transformational leaders: the full range leadership model in action. Ind Commer Train 38(1):23–32CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Kirkpatrick SA, Locke EA (1996) Direct and indirect effects of three core charismatic leadership components on performance and attitudes. J Appl Psychol 81(1):36–51CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Klein KJ, House RJ (1995) On fire: charismatic leadership and levels of analysis. Leadersh Q 6(2):183–198CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Northouse PG (2004) Leadership. Theory and practice. Sage, Thousand Oaks, CAGoogle Scholar
  42. Northouse PG (2007) Leadership. Theory and practice. Sage, Thousand Oaks, CAGoogle Scholar
  43. Podsakoff PM, Bommer WH, Podsakoff NP, MacKenzie SB (2006) Relationships between leader reward and punishment behavior and subordinate attitudes, perceptions, and behaviors: a meta-analytic review of existing and new research. Organ Behav Hum Decis Process 99(2):113–142CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Ritzer G (2007) Sociological theory, 7th edn. McGraw-Hill, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  45. Ropo A, Hunt JG (1999) Leadership and organizational change: some findings from a processual grounded theory study. In: Wagner JA III (ed) Advances in qualitative research. JAI-Press, Stamford, CT, pp 169–200Google Scholar
  46. Shamir B (1999) An evaluation of conceptual weaknesses in transformational and charismatic leadership theories. Leadersh Q 10(2):285–306CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  47. Shamir B, House RJ, Arthur M (1993) The motivational effects of charismatic leadership. A self-concept based theory. Organ Sci 4(4):577–594CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  48. Sosik JJ, Avolio BJ, Kahai SS (1997) Effects of leadership style and anonymity on group potency and effectiveness in a group decision support system environment. J Appl Psychol 82(1):89–103CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Steyrer J (1998) Charisma and the archetypes of leadership. Organ Stud 19(5):807–828CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  50. Van Seters DA, Field RHG (1990) The evolution of leadership theory. J Organ Change Manage 3(3):29–45CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  51. Weber M (1968) Economy and society: an outline of interpretive sociology. Bedminster Press, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  52. Yukl GA (1994) Leadership in organizations. Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJGoogle Scholar
  53. Yukl GA (1999) An evaluation of conceptual weaknesses in transformational and charismatic leadership theories. Leadersh Q 10(2):285–305CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  54. Yukl GA (2006) Leadership in organizations. Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJGoogle Scholar
  55. Yukl GA, Howell JM (1999) Organisational and contextual influences on the emergence and effectiveness of charismatic leadership. Leadersh Q 10(2):257–284CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Dept. Border Region StudiesUniversity of Southern DenmarkSønderborgDenmark

Personalised recommendations