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Quality of Work: The Case of Part-Time Work in Italy

  • Brendan J. Burchell
Chapter
Part of the AIEL Series in Labour Economics book series (AIEL)

Abstract

While the rate of part-time work has been consistent in the EU15 in the period 2000–2005, Italy has seen a large rise in women’s part-time work over that period. The likely cause of this rise in women’s part-time work is presumed to be the Italian enactment of the EU Part-Time Work Directive. Before 1984 Italian legislation had little provision for part-time work, and the Italian rate was well below the European average. But, the weak 1984 legislation was repealed by the then-conservative government to make way for the new directive adopted in 2000, and subsequently revised. As well as providing a clearer legislative framework on issues such as flexible working by part-timers, part-time work was claimed to offer important solutions to the Italian labour markets including reducing unemployment, increasing women’s employment and enhancing flexibility.

Keywords

Labour Market Italian Woman Italian Labour Market European Work Condition Survey European Work Condition Survey 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgements

I would like to thank Catherine O’Brien for assistance with the data preparation and Tindara Addabbo and Giovanni Solinas for valuable feedback on earlier drafts. I would also like to thank the Aiel for the conference invitation that lead to this paper.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of SociologyUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK

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