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Practical implications: Increasing the metagovernance capacity

Part of the Contributions to Management Science book series (MANAGEMENT SC.)

Abstract

Chapter 6 concluded that metagovernance played an important role in the five investigated cases, and that public managers acting as metagovernors had a characteristic logic of action. We will now discuss the practical implications of the concept of metagovernance for public managers, regarding three themes. Chapter 6 proposed that willingness, discretion and capability are three main qualifications for metagovernors. It is desirable to improve them, by increasing the willingness to take multiple perspectives, by optimising the level of discretion, and by selecting and training managers with metagovernance capabilities. This is addressed in Section 7.1.

Keywords

Process Management Public Manager Governance Environment Management Development Reform Programme 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Physica-Verlag Heidelberg 2008

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