Advertisement

Developing Sustainable Competitive Advantage through Operational Excellence and Adaptation Excellence with Value-Innovations

  • Kostas N. Dervitsiotis
Part of the Contributions to Management Science book series (MANAGEMENT SC.)

In a relatively stable environment most organizations can develop a strategic plan with a clear focus and direction. Its successful execution can achieve strategic goals mainly through operational excellence. However, when change in the external environment is rapid and outcomes cannot be anticipated, leadership must shift its priority to the exploration of new value opportunities and systematically experiment to see what works and what does not. Under such conditions what matters most is the capability to experiment efficiently, to test and to adapt to an environmental context undergoing significant change.

Leadership under these conditions must pursue a balance between the need for short-term earnings with an effective exploration of new opportunities and threats, as changes in customer preferences rearrange the competitive landscape. The quality of the value-innovation process will be determined by the creativity, talent and (tacit) knowledge of an organization’s employees, rather than the effectiveness and efficiency of the conventional supply chain which delivers its products and services.

Keywords

Tacit Knowledge Knowledge Creation Customer Preference Harvard Business School Sustainable Competitive Advantage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Barney JB (1991) Firm resources and sustained competitive advantage. Journal of Management 17:99-120CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bryan LL (2002) Just-in-Time Strategy for a Turbulent World. The McKinsey QuarterlyGoogle Scholar
  3. Christensen C (1998) The Innovator’s Dilemma. Harvard Business School Press, Cambridge MassachusettsGoogle Scholar
  4. Cohen D, Prusak L (2001) In Good Company: How Social Capital Makes Organizations Work. Harvard Business School Press, Cambridge MassachusettsGoogle Scholar
  5. Deming WE (1986) Out of the Crisis. Harvard Business School Press, Cambridge MassachusettsGoogle Scholar
  6. Dervitsiotis K (2001) Emerging Elements of a Worldview for Sustainable Quality. Total Quality Management and Business Excellence 12(7&8):817-824Google Scholar
  7. Dervitsiotis K (2006) Building Trust for Excellence in Performance and Adaptation to Change. Total Quality Management and Business Excellence 17 (7):795-810CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Drucker P (1985) Innovation and Entrepreunership. Heinemann, LondonGoogle Scholar
  9. Kim WC, Mauborne R (2005) Blue ocean strategy. Harvard Business School Press, Boston MassachusettsGoogle Scholar
  10. Kutschera H-J, Obdeijn P, Ilgner M, Hochberg Pv (2006) Relocate? Transform? Which Option Is Right? strategy+business magazine (Booz Allen Resilience Report) 10(17):1-7Google Scholar
  11. Mintzberg H (1973) The Nature of Managerial Work. Harper and Row, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  12. Slywotzky A (1996) Value Migration. Harvard Business School Press, Cambridge MassachusettsGoogle Scholar
  13. Senge P (1990) The Fifth Discipline: The Art and Practice of the Learning Organisation. Doubleday, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  14. Krogh Gv, Ichijo K, Nonaka I (2000) Enabling Knowledge Creation. Oxford University Press, OxfordGoogle Scholar
  15. Wenger E, McDermott R, Snyder WM (2002) Cultivating Communities of Practice. Harvard Business School Press, Cambridge MassachusettsGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Physica-Verlag Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kostas N. Dervitsiotis
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Business AdministrationUniversity of PiraeusGreece

Personalised recommendations