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Human Factors and Comprehensive Management Concepts: A Need for Integration Based on Corporate Sustainability

  • Klaus J. Zink
Part of the Contributions to Management Science book series (MANAGEMENT SC.)

Many of the papers in this book have dealt with sustainability in relationship to either total quality management respectively organizational excellence concepts or human factors approaches especially understood as human factors in organizational design and management. This paper discusses the development of human factors and TQM and shows their relationship. In a next step a possible integration for both TQM and human factors into the context of sustainability is shown. Finally it will be argued that sustainability can provide a basis for the integration of both concepts. Such an approach could promote both disciplines, but also improve the implementation of corporate sustainability.

Keywords

Corporate Social Responsibility Human Factor Organizational Design Total Quality Management Corporate Sustainability 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Physica-Verlag Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Klaus J. Zink
    • 1
  1. 1.Chair of Industrial Management and Human FactorsUniversity of KaiserslauternGermany

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