Advertisement

The Role of Ergonomics in Securing Sustainability in Developing Countries

  • Patricia Ann Scott
Part of the Contributions to Management Science book series (MANAGEMENT SC.)

This paper addresses the issue of sustainable effects of appropriately conceived ergonomic interventions in the industrially developing Third World. It is argued that all targets of the Rio Declaration of 1992 relative to sustainable progress (economic, social and environmental) can be addressed by appropriate ergonomic intervention where it is most needed viz. in developing regions. When economic, social and environmental conditions are poorest, small unremitting improvements have a greater impact than when conditions are optimal. The small changes ergonomists can easily effect in ameliorating working conditions in industrially developing countries can reverberate through local, regional, even national economies, and if done correctly, these effects will be culturally absorbed thereby ensuring sustainability. When an ethos for care of national resources, be they human or physical, is inculcated, the goals of the Rio Declaration are met. It is no exaggeration to assert that ergonomics, properly administrated in industrially developing countries, has a meaningful role to play in this connection.

Keywords

Work Shift Corporate Sustainability Ergonomic Intervention Negative Spiral Heavy Manual Labor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Apud E (2006) A review of 30 years of ergonomics in Chilean forestry. (Proceedings “Meeting Diversity in Ergonomics” of the XVIth Triennial Congress of the International Ergonomics Association, 10-14 July in Maastricht)Google Scholar
  2. Kogi K (1997) Low-cost ergonomic solutions in small-scale industries in developing countries. African Newsletter on Occupational Health and Safety 7(2):31-33Google Scholar
  3. Kogi K, Itanib T and Baltinoc JM (2006) Productivity increase from low-cost ergonomic improvements through participatory training in small enterprises. (Proceedings “Meeting Diversity in Ergonomics” of the XVIth Triennial Congress of the International Ergonomics Association, 10-14 July in Maastricht)Google Scholar
  4. O’Neill DH (2000) Ergonomics in industrially developing countries: does its application differ from that in industrially advanced countries? Applied Ergonomics 31:631-640CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Scott PA (2001a) Past, present and future perspectives of Ergonomics in South Africa. (Keynote address at the 8th Biennial Conference of the Ergonomics Society of South Africa, 17-18 May in Gauteng)Google Scholar
  6. Scott PA (2001b) The key to humanizing the work environment and improving productivity in Industrially Developing Countries. (Keynote address within the Proceedings “Humanizing work and work environment” of the International Ergonomics Conference, 11-14 December in Mumbai)Google Scholar
  7. Scott PA (2006) Ergonomics in Industrially Developing Countries: past developments and future directions. (Proceedings “Meeting Diversity in Ergonomics” of the XVIth Triennial Congress of the International Ergonomics Association, 10-14 July in Maastricht)Google Scholar
  8. Scott PA, Charteris J (2004) Ergonomics in Industrially Developing Countries (IDCs): socio-cultural perspectives. In: Kaplan M (ed) Cultural Ergonomics. Elsevier, New York, pp 223-248CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Scott PA, Christie C (2004) An indirect method to assess the energy expenditure of manual labourers in situ. South African Journal of Science 100:694-698Google Scholar
  10. Scott PA, Shahnavaz H (1997) Ergonomics training in industrially developing countries: case studies from “Roving Seminars”. (Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, 24-28 August, San Francisco)Google Scholar
  11. Sen RN (1984) Application of ergonomics to industrially developing countries. Ergonomics 27:1021-1032CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Shahnavaz H (1996) Making ergonomics a world wide concept. Ergonomics 39(12):1391-1402CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Physica-Verlag Heidelberg 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patricia Ann Scott
    • 1
  1. 1.Rhodes UniversitySouth Africa

Personalised recommendations