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Why Exactly has CSR Become a Necessity?

Part of the Contributions to Economics book series (CE)

Abstract

One can observe CSR has emerged and been pushed forward throughout the 20th century, especially after socio-economic and socio-legal developments have shifted considerable social power to the private economy in general, and more specifically to (large) corporations.

Keywords

Corporate Governance Private Business Product Liability Corporate Scandal Street Crime 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Physica-Verlag Heidelberg 2008

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