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The Chinese banking sector

Part of the Contributions to Economics book series (CE)

Abstract

Like the Indian banking sector, the banking sector in China is currently undergoing a profound transition.1 Since China will be used to compare the progress and performance of reforms in India, this section attempts to give an overview of relevant aspects of the Chinese banking sector. The focus is on the development of the banking sector, its current structure and the major reforms initiated over the last years. In addition, relevant similarities and differences of the banking sectors of the two countries are discussed, as well as the possibilities and limitations of a comparison.

Keywords

Commercial Bank Banking Sector Credit Cooperative Deutsche Bank Research Chinese Banking Sector 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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© Physica-Verlag Heidelberg 2008

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