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The Indian banking sector

Part of the Contributions to Economics book series (CE)

Abstract

This chapter gives an in-depth overview of the Indian banking sector and its structural setting. The focus is on the development of the sector since 1947, with special emphasis on the reforms that have taken place since 1991. Furthermore, it examines the structural setting of the Indian banking sector and its political, economic and institutional environment.

Keywords

Interest Rate Gross Domestic Product Banking System Commercial Bank Banking Sector 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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