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Introduction

Part of the Contributions to Economics book series (CE)

Abstract

A banking sector performs three primary functions in an economy: the operation of the payment system, the mobilization of savings and the allocation of savings to investment projects. By allocating capital to the highest value use while limiting the risks and costs involved, the banking sector can positively influence the overall economy and is thus of broad macroeconomic importance.1

Keywords

Commercial Bank Banking Sector Market Failure Coordination Mechanism State Involvement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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© Physica-Verlag Heidelberg 2008

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