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Grilling the Grid: a Non-Ultimate (Nor Objective) Report on the Configurational Approach to Urban Phenomena

  • Valerio Cutini

Abstract

This paper is a report on the configurational theory, the unconventional approach to urban phenomena that was introduced by Bill Hillier in the mid ’80s and still attracts and stimulates researchers all over the world. It won’t be exhaustive, since it can’t but neglect most of the several techniques that, on the common configurational basis, have been worked out so far. It won’t be ultimate, since at present researchers are still working hard and carrying on developments on the matter. It won’t be objective either, since the stated purpose of the paper is the introduction and the discussion of a new, original method, the MaPPA, and its placement as the logical terminus of decades of studies and experimentations.

But, all in all, the underlying purpose of the paper is to outline the usefulness and the reliability of such approach, to highlight benefits and limits of the several techniques, as well as to figure possible lines of improvement and development of the presented methods.

Keywords

Convex Space Urban Space Visibility Graph Natural Movement Historic Centre 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Physica-Verlag Heidelberg and Accademia di Architettura, Mendrisio, Switzerland 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Valerio Cutini
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Civil EngineeringUniversity of PisaItaly

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